Friends of the Upper Mississippi

Our Vision Statement

To work to protect, enhance and restore our Upper Mississippi River resources by serving as volunteers and partners with conservation organizations to provide education about these resources for our citizens, to advocate for government policies that will support these resources and to increase awareness of threats to the health of the Upper Mississippi River.

Genoa Fish Clinic

Genoa Fish Clinic – Genoa, WI

Mission of the Friends of the Upper Mississippi

  • Provide volunteer services to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other Conservation organizations for native species restoration and population monitoring.
  • Provide education programs for members and the general public on conservation issues and benefits
  • Provide grants for educational activities
  • Provide outdoor activities for children
  • Be a primary point of contact with local and national public officials in support of Mississippi River resources
  • Provide fundraising activities to support local conservation programs
  • Inform local groups and provide education on conservation issues

Lake Sturgeon “Twice Tagged” at Genoa NFH

BY AARON VON ESCHEN, GENOA NFH
The time to shine has come for the last remaining lot of lake sturgeon at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery (NFH). It has been almost a year since this lot of Wolf River strain lake sturgeon arrived at Genoa and these fish were being held for a very special purpose. Their larger size made this lot ideal for studying retention of differing fishery tags. In order to get the fish tagged with both PIT tags and Coded Wire tags, many partners joined forces, including Ashland Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office (FWCO), Green Bay FWCO, La Crosse FWCO, and staff from Genoa NFH. The objective of this study was to tag all the lake sturgeon with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and coded wire tags (CWT) for tag retention evaluation. Biological and tagging specific data for each fish was entered in a data file, so that later tag retention data can be associated with tag type, initial fish size, and tagging procedure/crew.

stugeonThis Lake sturgeon volunteered to be the next one tagged. Credit: USFWS

PIT tags are small glass capsules that encase a very small microchip that provides a unique serial number to each tagged fish. Once tagged the fish can be scanned with an electronic PIT tag reader, which display’s the serial number thus providing the fish-specific identification number. CWTs are small magnetic steel tags that are inserted in the sturgeon’s snout or underneath a scale (scute) and detected with handheld metal detectors known as wands. Generally PIT tags have come in one size (12mm) however a new smaller PIT tag (9mm) has been developed and may provide a new option for tagging of smaller fish. CWTs have been used to tag smaller size fish, however with the PIT tag an individual fish can be tracked and accounted for, as opposed to just identifying a single lot of fish as with CWTs. All fish were scheduled to be rechecked one month after tagging to get a good grasp on the tag retention of each tag type and size.

taggersTagging crew at Genoa NFH hard at work. Credit: USFWS

The staff at the Genoa NFH would like to thank the members of the FWCO offices, La Crosse Fish Health office, and members from the Menominee Tribe for cooperating in the tagging study.

Interpretive Center Construction Begins in Earnest

visitor center
April means not only the lifting of road weight restrictions in most of Wisconsin, but it also means the beginning of construction season for much of the northland. At the Genoa National Fish Hatchery it also means years of planning are coming to fruition with the construction of the Great River Road Interpretive Center at the hatchery site. The Great River Road Interpretive Center is one of a series of visitor contact centers for travelers that use the National Scenic Byway that bisects the hatchery, State Highway 35. The Wisconsin Great River Roadis a 250 mile drive winding through 33 river towns and is Wisconsin’s only designated National Scenic Byway. The road runs along the Mississippi River through some of Wisconsin’s oldest and most historic communities. The scenery features stunning bluffs with scenic overlooks, a variety of wildlife, and beautiful countryside along the river. The hatchery received a grant in 2010 through the National Scenic Byways Program to build a visitor contact center that would interpret the intrinsic value of the Upper Mississippi River. The center will focus on the history of conservation in the Region, and discuss the River’s value from prehistoric time to the present. The center will also have an exhibit on the battle of Bad Axe, the last conflict east of the Mississippi River between Native Americans, and the United States Army. Groundbreaking for the Center began this April with Pangea Group from St. Louis, Missouri acquiring the bid. A local company, St. Joseph Construction has begun moving dirt and installing retaining walls in preparation for the actual building construction. Projected building completion is estimated to be the fall of 2015, with hopes of a grand opening ceremony in the spring of 2016.

Spring in the Air & Nets in the Water

netter
BY ANGELA BARAN, GENOA NFH
Spring was a little slow to show up this year, staff from Genoa National Fish Hatchery (NFH) usually start setting nets in the Mississippi River in the middle to late March, but water and air temperatures pushed things back until April 7th. The continual rise and fall of the temperature and rising and falling water levels stretched the spawning season out for the whole month of April.
Hatchery staff returned from setting up the sturgeon trailer in Michigan to hop in the boat and set out the walleye nets. During the spring netting, eggs are collected from walleye to support not only the fish culture programs but also for the mussel program.
Walleye are the host fish for black sandshell mussels, an endangered or species of concern for several states. Walleye eggs are also sent to state partners for their restoration programs, this year Genoa was able to ship out 10 million eggs to New Mexico and two million eggs to DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge in Nebraska. Walleye fry are sent to the Menominee Indian Tribe to be stocked in their ponds to grow out and then stocked out in the fall. During the spring netting, Genoa NFH also helps out the La Crosse Fish Health Office by collecting wild fish from the Mississippi River for the National Wild Fish Health Survey. The Fish and Wildlife Service continually samples waters throughout the country to monitor the health of fish populations, for more information you can visit the website: http://www.fws.gov/wildfishsurvey/.

“Spring has Finally Sprung” at Genoa NFH’s Outdoor Classroom

BY JORGE BUENING, GENOA NFH
This year especially, it seems that winter was very reluctant to loosen its frozen grip on the Genoa National Fish Hatchery (NFH). Inevitably winter relented and we were rewarded with walleye and
sturgeon to spawn, fish to distribute, and visits from our area outdoor classroom participants.
The season started off with a visit from the 5th graders of Summit Environmental School. During their visit these students received a tour of the hatchery that highlighted the spring activities that
the hatchery was involved with, including spawning and pond setup. While here they also worked on cleaning out last year’s growth from our butterfly garden and planting some early vegetables. Along with that activity they planted the initial plants in our new prairie garden alongside our archery range. All of these plantings were done with the assistance ofthe La Crosse Garden Club, who were equally ready to start some spring plantings. Next, the 7th and 8th graders from Lincoln Middle School made a visit. These students were divided into four groups that rotated through four stations. These stations consisted of an outdoor reading station, a frog call station, a bird call station, and a fish and freshwater mussel station. Students received lessons on the subject matter in class and then they tried out their newly found knowledge in our wetland and prairie habitat zones. Even though spring had sprung, poor weather conditions postponed the hatchery visit with Southern Bluffs Elementary. So we just made a trip to Southern Bluffs Elementary School. During this classroom visit students learned about freshwater mussels.

kids

The students learned how we remove glochidia (larval mussels) from freshwater mussels and saw what they look like before attaching to a host fish under a microscope. The students then witnessed the fish become infested with freshwater mussels.
Again this spring has given us an opportunity to share what we do with the younger generations. We hopefully have conveyed the importance of maintaining a healthy environment and learning about the world around us. Some of these young people held their first freshwater mussel, others heard their first red-winged blackbird, and still others planted their first plant. All of these experiences preserve conservation in the minds of our youth and galvanize the mind-set to carry them on for future generations.

Baby Brookies are Ready for Spring!

brookies

By Angela Baran

 

Newly hatched brook trout fry, note the orange yolk sacs the fry will use for nutrition for their first couple weeks / USFWS.

Genoa National Fish Hatchery in Genoa, Wisconsin has received its annual shipment of coaster brook trout eggs from the Iron River National Fish Hatchery in Iron River, Wisconsin.
The eggs arrived on station January 28, 2014 and started hatching on February 9, 2014. Genoa received 200,000 eggs to ensure enough fish for 67,000 spring fingerlings and 10,000 yearlings for restoration efforts in Lake Superior and native waters around Grand Portage, Minnesota. Iron River NFH and Genoa NFH have worked with the Grand Portage Tribe for several years to preserve the population and bring it back to historic levels.
The hatchery has traditionally requested larger numbers of eggs to ensure the needed stocking amounts. Over the last three years maintenance staff at Genoa installed new tanks, improved plumbing and added monitoring and alarm systems. These improvements increase survival dramatically at the early life stages of the baby brookies, causing a new issue of over-crowding.
The problem is easily remedied at Genoa by using the fish as a forage base for catfish infested with endangered winged mapleleaf mussels. This clean, high energy food source helps to keep the catfish well fed and reduces their chances of diseases from other forage sources. At each stage of development, once the needed numbers of fish are obtained, the lot of fish will be reduced to prevent overcrowding. With 120,000 spring fingerlings as of April, the catfish are guaranteed a great lunch!

Fisheries Offices Celebrate Volunteer Support

BY DOUG ALOISI, GENOA NFH

volunteer photoGenoa NFH Project Leader Doug Aloisi with Volunteer of the Year Lloyd Lorenz and Conservation Steward Awardee Brigid Raiman. Credit: USFWS
The three La Crosse Wisconsin (WI) area U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Fisheries offices held their Annual Volunteer and Friends Appreciation Banquet, at the Boot Hill Restaurant’s conference room in La Crosse, WI. The FWS offices are comprised of the La Crosse Fish Health Center, the La Crosse Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office and the Genoa National Fish Hatchery.

There was a great turnout on hand, with over 50 of our combined volunteers, friends and their spouses attending. During calendar year 2013, at the Genoa National Fish Hatchery alone, over 1091 volunteer hours were logged on high priority programs such as freshwater mussel and lake sturgeon restoration, coaster brook trout marking and environmental education programs such as the outdoor classroom.

A few special awards were handed out for calendar year 2013, with Lloyd Lorenz receiving our Volunteer of the Year Award. Lloyd has logged over 464 volunteer hours in the last three years and is one of the hatchery’s most dedicated volunteers. Two special awards were also presented during the evening. Brigid Reimann was presented with the hatchery’s annual Conservation Steward Award. This award is generally given out to a local area educator who has excelled in instilling a conservation ethic in the upcoming generation. Brigid has been instrumental in getting the hatchery’s Sturgeon in a Classroom program instituted in Merrill (WI) High School. She also led development of a small scale aquaculture system using surplus hatchery tanks and station culture expertise to begin teaching aquaculture skills to the Merrill Agricultural Program. In addition, Ken Visger, longtime Friend Board of Directors member was presented with a Meritorious Service Award for his energy to form and lead our La Crosse area Fisheries Friends Group for the last decade. The three La Crosse area FWS Fisheries offices look forward to Calendar Year 2014′s volunteer programs and working alongside these dedicated people that care for and serve to protect our natural resources.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Habitat Restoration Programs Create Jobs, Pump Millions into Local Economies

PartnersForFishWildlifePartners for Fish and Wildlife staff meets with private landowners in Michigan to review habitat restoration project. (Photo by USFWS)

 

A peer-reviewed analysis finds that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s habitat restoration programs are extraordinary engines for the U.S. economy.

The report, Restoration Returns: The Contribution of Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program and Coastal Program Projects to Local U.S. Economies, finds that by working with partners Service programs created more than 3,900 jobs in Fiscal Year 2011 and generated a total economic stimulus of $327.6 million.

Each year, the Service completes more than 3,500 public-private partnership habitat restoration projects under the two programs, which leverage government dollars to generate private sector investment that is channeled into local communities.

The Partners for Fish and Wildlife program works with willing landowners to improve wildlife habitat. Landowners agree to maintain the projects for at least 10 years, but otherwise retain full control of their land. In Fiscal Year 2011:

• $18.6 million was invested nationwide through the program, leveraging more than $142 million in private sector contributions, totaling $161 million in restoration spending.
• When cycled through the economy, the projects generated more than $292 million for local economies, a return of $15.70 for every federal dollar spent.
• More than 3,500 jobs were created.

The Service’s Coastal Program works with communities and partners to undertake projects that protect and restore vital wildlife habitat. Projects include removing invasive species, replanting salt marsh and sea grasses, and installing living shorelines to prevent erosion. In Fiscal Year 2011:

• $2.8 million was spent on projects, leveraging more than $16 million from project partners, totaling 19.2 million in project funds.
• After cycling through the economy, these project funds provided $35.6 million in local economic stimulus, a return of $12.78 for every federal dollar spent.
• More than 470 jobs were created.

To see the entire report at: www.fws.gov/home/restoration_returns.html

A Spring Cleaning

pills                                                                                                                  healthy people

On April 26, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will coordinate a collaborative effort with participating state and local law enforcement agencies nationwide to safely remove potentially dangerous pharmaceutical controlled substances and other medications from our nation’s medicine cabinets.
This initiative compliments the Service’s continuing SMARXT DISPOSAL campaign program, a collaborative effort with the American Pharmacist’s Association and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, to educate consumers how to dispose of unwanted medications in a responsible manner that safeguards lives and protects the environment.

The public is encouraged to take their expired, unused, and unwanted medications to one of the hundreds of sites around the country where they will be collected for destruction, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. local time, on Saturday, April 26.
A continuously updated list of collection sites in or near your community can be found on the Internet by visiting www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/ drug_disposal/takeback
More than 1,733 tons of unwanted meds were collected nationwide during seven earlier DEA-sponsored disposal  events, protecting both human and environmental safety.

RX meds

 

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!